Life writing and human rights genres of testimony of the two

Life Narratives Research Group LNR We live in the age of life stories In every format of every media and in every academic discipline, self-reflection, life writing, offering one's life story within travel books, scholarly articles, broadcasts, political web sites or newspaper blogs has become a standard tool of communication and the dissemination of information in our time. While much is claimed for the value and significance of the life narrative, however, from the possibility of individual redemption to the constructing of national narratives of truth and reconciliation, the contexts of such constructions remain under-theorised. Whether writing of our own lives in the form of auto-biography, memoir, Snapchat story or diary, testifying in a court of law, or in our endeavours to research and write the lives of others, there is little sharing of experience or debate upon the nature of such work across the many disciplines in which life narratives have become a central preoccupation.

Life writing and human rights genres of testimony of the two

In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: We Shall Bear Witness: Life Narratives and Human Rights ed. Life Narratives and Human Rights.

life writing and human rights genres of testimony of the two

U of Wisconsin P, Human rights lawyer Mark Muller opens his contribution to this collection with a reflection: Readers of We Shall Bear Witness will appreciate that the editors Meg Jensen and Margaretta Jolly likewise recognize the value of bringing together many perspectives and voices.

The writers in this collection include survivors, witnesses, and advocates; activists, artists, and academics; and researchers in fields such as English, psychology, and health care ethics. This array points to a wide interest in writing and rights in and beyond academia. Furthermore, this range of voices suggests the number of readers for whom We Shall Bear Witness represents an exciting and important new resource.

Academic disciplines in the humanities and social sciences increasingly recognize self-representation as a valuable theoretical lens.

life writing and human rights genres of testimony of the two

Within these critical conversations, We Shall Bear Witness proposes ways of analyzing the construction of life stories as rights stories. By approaching life rights stories in these ways, we can account for the persuasive power of the genre, and also its politicization.

We Shall Bear Witness is organized in five parts, examining the production, reception, and mobilization of life stories.

How do we recognize contemporary activists and claimants? Several of the writers in this collection articulate multiple positions themselves, and consider human rights from multiple perspectives.

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You are not currently authenticated. View freely available titles:linkages between the two, especially if we recognize that the human envisioned by human rights is a creature of the law and the state; that is, the human of the law and the human of .

Life Writing and Human Rights: Genres of Testimony. The stories we tell about our lives and the lives of those around us leave footprints across history. That history can be of personal, familial or of widespread political and public importance.

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In the same way that the genres of life writing such as memoir or diary create the terms within which people create identities, Internet affordances can work (sometimes covertly) to create the terms for identification and the rules for social interaction (5).

In the same way that the genres of life writing such as memoir or diary create the terms within which people create identities, Internet affordances can work (sometimes covertly) to create the terms for identification and the rules for social interaction (5).

The chapter is anchored by non-canonical life writing genres (human rights reports and survivor accounts of torture).

Barbara does not call these documents life [End Page ] writing, nor is she interested in "theorizing" them in that mode. “universal” discourse of Human Rights.

I have elsewhere argued that “trauma” could function as a critical-analytical category to analyze women’s experiences even when the victims are from different social, cultural and economic backgrounds (Nayar, “Trauma, Testimony and Human Rights”).

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