Revising a narrative essay

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Revising a narrative essay

You have always written before and you will write now. All you have to do is write one true sentence. Write the truest sentence that you know.

The writing ends up dry and wordy, replete with spelling errors and comma splices, barely held together with an argument that wanders. These errors distract the reader and discredit the writer.

You can avoid falling into this trap by starting early, getting organized, and getting busy with writing, revising, and editing. If you start early enough, you will have time to go through the process several times before you have to turn it in, and you will have a perfectly polished final draft.

People always procrastinate, and more than likely, your paper is due in less than a week. But even if your paper is due in a few hours, making the effort to draft and revise your work with care and consideration will make all the difference!

In fact, sometimes that last minute pressure is just what you need to break your writer's block. A game plan is critical! A Room of Your Own One of the keys to successful writing is finding a comfortable space to think. Find out what works best for you.

Or for a quieter space, go back to the library and find a corner. Feel the wisdom of the dusty stacks of books leading you to successful writing! If you have a little more time though, allow yourself to focus your energies at the times when you will be the most efficient.

At what time of day do you feel the most focused? Try getting up early in the morning to write. The crisp stillness of the dawn can be calming and conducive to writing. Brew a fresh cup of coffee and listen to the first chirp of the birds as you sit down to write your paper.

Some work best under the pressure of nightfall. Whatever the case, this exercise below can help you organize your thoughts before you write. If you know what you want to say before you start writing, the process will go much faster and be a lot easier.

You've done piles of great research, and finished the hunting and gathering stage. You need a big space to see the big picture, so clear the kitchen table.

Revising a narrative essay

Keep the outline in front of you. Pile all the cards or files in categories so you can see what you've got. You may have picked up a new category or two during the research process. Read through the piles and find the juiciest tidbits.

You're going to organize your paper around your best stuff. Now take your original outline and compare your piles to your main outlined points. So you are writing a paper on the environmental history of a local park. Your original outline has these main points: Your note card pile on park history is the tallest, full of information on who designed the park, how the land had to be altered to build it, etc.

Your pile on park wildlife is a bit anemic, although you did find a cute story online about how children at a local elementary school wrote short stories about the park's deer population.

The public library had good books on the area's vegetation history so you're covered there. Your best pile is on water issues. The local newspaper published several articles on the area's lakes and rivers and there was a story about a fish kill in your park's lake. You followed up on those stories by examining an aerial photo archive of how the city dredged the lake, studying historic land survey maps of the area, by interviewing the city's ecologist, and by listening to oral histories in the university's oral history archive; there was a treasure trove of interviews with elderly fishing club members.

The information in your final pile on people's uses of the park dovetails with the water issues pile because the lake is a popular fishing and boating spot.

Overall, your best stuff is in the history pile, the water issues pile, and the public uses pile. We know that you're passionate about the secret life of squirrels and wildlife biology but you don't have enough information.Each of these titles is available under a Creative Commons license (consult the individual text for the license specifics).

Click on the title to view the chapter abstract and a downloadable PDF of the chapter. Interesting Personal Essay Ideas. A personal essay gives the reader a glimpse of your personal life experience. A lot of times you may need to compose a personal essay. Sep 03,  · Expert Reviewed.

How to Write a Narrative Essay. Four Parts: Choosing a Good Topic Writing a Draft Revising Your Essay Sample Essay Community Q&A Narrative essays are commonly assigned pieces 78%().

The Online Writing Lab (OWL) at Purdue University houses writing resources and instructional material, and we provide these as a free service of the Writing Lab at Purdue. A revision and editing checklist to prepare the final version of your narrative essay or other composition.

While narrative essays are non-fiction, elements of fiction should not be ignored. True stories also benefit from the writer’s ability to use plot-building techniques.

3. Revising a Narrative Essay. In the revision phase, students review, modify, and reorganize their work with the goal of making it the best it can be.

Englishbiz - GCSE English and English Literature Revision Guides